Clinical research using Medifast protocols and products

Clinical research using Medifast protocols and products

Clinical Study 2

REFERENCE: Matalon, V. “An Evaluation of Weight Loss following a Carbohydrate and Fat Restricted Diet with Appetite Suppressant and Dietary Supplementation.” The Bariatrician Summer 2000.

PURPOSE: An open label trial designed to assess the safety and effectiveness of a weight-loss regimen consisting of a carbohydrate- and fat-restricted diet, supplemented with an appetite suppressant, a dietary supplement, and a liquid protein drink (Medifast). At baseline, evaluations included a history and physical, and measurements of total body weight (lbs), body fat (%), BMI, lean body mass, water weight and blood pressure. Patients were then seen weekly for 6 months. At each weekly visit, total weight, % body fat, BMI, lean body mass, water weight, and BP were noted. At the end of the study statistically significant differences from baseline to final value were noted for body weight (p<.001), percent body fat (p<.001), BMI (p<.001), lean body mass (p<.001), water weight (p=.01) and body systolic (p=.003) and diastolic (p<.001) blood pressure.

RESULTS: Of 47 patients enrolled, 24 (51%) completed six months using the dietary regimen prescribed. Data was analyzed for all patients who were treated with the diet, as well as for the subset of patients who completed the entire study period. The dietary regimen showed that a carbohydrate- and fat-restricted program supplemented by a natural appetite suppressant can lead to progressive weight loss of comparable value to prescribed pharmacologic agents at the time of study. Patients in the study experienced statistically significant decreases in overall body weight, percent body fat, BMI, lean body mass, total body water and both systolic and diastolic blood pressure.

Clinical Study 2

REFERENCE: Davis, L. M.; Coleman, C. D.; Andersen, W. S.; and Cheskin, L. J. “The Effect of Metabolism-Boosting Beverages on 24-hr Energy Expenditure.” The Open Nutrition Journal. 2: 37-41. 2008.

PURPOSE: The effect of thermogenic meal replacement beverages (TMRB) containing 90 mg of EGCG and 100 mg of caffeine on resting energy expenditure (REE). Thirty adults (19 women, 11 men) were stratified into 3 groups: lean (n=10, BMI 21.5 ± 2.1), overweight/obese (OW) (n=10, BMI 29.8 ± 2.7), or weight maintainers (WM) (n=10, BMI 28.8 ± 4.0). Following an overnight fast, baseline measurements, including REE via indirect calorimetry, were performed. REE was repeated at 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after consuming a TMRB. Appetite was assessed via visual analogue scale at baseline, 30 minutes and 120 minutes after the TMRB.

RESULTS: Mean 24-hour REE was increased 5.9 ± 2.5% overall (p=0.000), 5.7 ± 3.1% among lean subjects (p=0.0002), 5.3 ± 1.4% among OW subjects (p=0.000), and 6.8 ± 2.7% among WM (p=0.0007). Appetite was significantly reduced 30 minutes after the TMRB (p=0.0002). TMRB appear to be a promising weight control tool.

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